Why it’s harder to talk about being happy than it is to talk about being sad

There have been references to ‘action for happiness’ all over my Twitter stream today. I have been ignoring them because, really, it seems a little twee in the light of what’s going on at the moment.

I am interested in – and a little embarrassed by – my reaction.

I was going to skim over it until I realised that the theme resonated with a subject I was considering for my next blog post. The fact that being happy seems, to me, to be linked somewhere into the notion of being brave.

I have been really happy for the past few weeks.

There is a smile that tugs at the corner of my mouth, even when no one is looking. I wake up feeling enthusiastic; I go to bed satisfied and buzzing. My life feels full of people and energy and possibility.

It is scary as shit.

I have been trying to tell myself that pre-empting a black cloud will invite a shadow. That there is no point in spoiling the sentiment by fearing what might – or might not – come next. I have been reminding myself that a fall is not inevitable – and if it should come, then I will dust myself up and move on again. I have allowed my enthusiasm to bubble up and out, and I am not afraid that, should next week not be so rosy, than I will feel like a fool.

And so it has struck me that there is a certain type of courage in letting the excitement shine through and acknowledging happiness.

There is the possibility that it might be shot down, as I have shot down a movement that, in my heart of hearts, I can see true value in. There is the fear that it might be lost, though should this happen, it is unlikely to be connected to the acknowledgement. There is a slight conditioning towards modesty, and restraint, and tempered reactions, that I no longer believe in, nor consider to be the only option –

Because there is also, as I am starting to see, an opportunity to share, and celebrate, and enjoy these feelings; and a group of wonderful people who are willing, if I let them, to join in.

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6 responses to “Why it’s harder to talk about being happy than it is to talk about being sad

  1. One of my recovery friends recently said (I said I was really anxious about relapse) that staying with that fear is like holding a raccoon worrying about it being rabid. And then that: “I have a tendency to let that fear consume me to a point where the only relief from the fear/anxiety is to just make that fear a reality.” Which I relate to, a lot. So I have to be brave too, and make myself keep walking away from the fears.

    • That’s a great insight – it took me a while to process but yes, I think that’s right and it is about walking away from – or facing head on – the fears. Thanks for sharing this Holly.

  2. Beautifully and truly put, thankyou.

  3. This: “I have been trying to tell myself that pre-empting a black cloud will invite a shadow. That there is no point in spoiling the sentiment by fearing what might – or might not – come next.”

    Yes. You are so much wiser than you know. xoxo

  4. Thank you 🙂 Wise in some ways and so not wise in others! Need to keep putting the wisdom into practice I think though. That’s the challenge: acting rather than thinking.

    xx

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